Compatibility test: Should I stay or should I go?

Woman picking petals off a flowerValentine’s Day celebration of love. Or is it? History reveals it is actually the peak season for relationship break ups?

Don’t you wish you had a crystal ball? Try our Relationship Radar (RR) compatibility test and find out how if your relationship will withstand the test of time.

So why is Valentine’s Day the peak of national break ups?

With Valentine’s Day approaching fast statistics are not in your favour, with 4 in every 10 couples going on shaky ground.
Just weeks before Valentine’s Day, is one on the most volatile periods of a relationship. Historically the trend is couples stay together during the festive season particularly with family gatherings to avoid confrontation. As soon as New Year is here, resolutions are high on the agenda and finding new love or true love as we call it is a top priority alongside weight loss and making more money.

Your crystal ball, should I stay or should I go?

Blue Label Life’s exclusive RR compatibility test is the perfect tool for you to look into the future of your love life. It can help solidify your existing relationship, just by knowing your strengths or weaknesses or can give you the answer those questions lurking in the back of your mind; should I stay or should I go?

The RR compatibility test reveals:

Exclusively utilised in matchmaking professionals singles by Blue Label Life the RR compatibility test is based on 50 factors that remain unknown in the honeymoon period. Yet, as time goes by, often leave you wondering what you ever see in that person! If a relationship is to stand the test of time, factors such as; attitudes toward spending, family values, sexual compatibility, politics, preferences with food, television programs, smoking, drinking and neatness are important to consider.

Studies reveal RR compatibility testing is important.

After an advanced analysis, studies show that:

  • Higher Relationship Radar compatibility has been proven to give those people a better chance of long-term relationship success.
  • Happily married people had higher RR scores than those whose relationships weren’t so satisfactory.
  • Couples who shared the same view on career satisfaction and income earnings are eight times as likely to be happy as couples with different views on this issue.
  • Couples who share the same attitude toward traveling are almost four times as like to be happy as those who disagree with the issue.
  • Women married to men who share the same view on household chores as themselves are three times more likely to express happiness with their marriage.
  • Men’s satisfaction does not appear to be affected by whether or not their wife has a different career path.