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When should waiting for ‘The One’ be done?

Technology has its perks, but what cost does it have to society and relationships. Think about it; for something that was designed to completely revolutionise the way people meet and interact, all it’s achieved is chaos.

Society’s newfound desire for instant communication has contributed to the growing number of single men and women. Finding love was so much easier 30 years ago. Boy meets girl, boy woos girl, boy keeps girl. Simple. There was no need to lie about your age or Photoshop your profile picture, no pressure to get plastic surgery to compete with millions of other lonely hearts, and second chances not only existed, but also were encouraged.

What was once a choice between chicken and fish has now become a choice of country, city, restaurant, menu and price. By the time we decide (and that’s if we decide) on what to eat, the food may arrive cold, so to speak.

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It’s only natural that we want to make use of our options. And why wouldn’t we? After all, the more people we meet, the more chance of finding “The One”. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for true love. The chance to play cupid and be someone’s arrow of good fortune is what drew me to matchmaking in the first place, but there comes a time when our proverbial hourglass is up.

That’s when it all changes.

We go from using words like “soulmate” to phrases like “settling down”, and we wonder where our dream of a white picket fence went horribly wrong.

If this sounds like you, don’t fret. Things can be a lot worse. I will however, say this; perfection is a myth. It’s a word someone invented to motivate people to do better.

People are always searching for their perfect match, but would you really want to meet someone exactly like you? Our flaws, like our strengths, are what make us unique. They’re what spark conversation, passion and opinion. Even that seemingly “perfect” couple we all know and secretly hate have their fair share of differences. What makes them so hateable is that those differences compliment each other’s strengths.

Perfection may be a myth, but it is attainable. One of my favourite quotes is by French philosopher Albert Camus. He says; “you will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.”

To me, perfection is when you stop finding the need to be perfect. Perfection is when you stop looking at the menu and taste the dish your waiter suggests. Who knows, it could be the most fulfilling meal of your life.

So what do you think? When should waiting for ‘The One’ be done? At what point should you stop waiting for the perfect person?

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